Fashion, LaBranche, Other Plantations Destroyed

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Prospect Plantation was built circa 1815 by Edgar LaBranche who later expanded the plantation from the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain.

Rise of Plantations

"Mozella Plantation—Hicks Lewis Youngs and brother Elias moved to the German Coast from New York City in 1851. The Youngs brothers acquired Joseph Marioneau’s property through a series of buyouts and established a sugar and cotton plantation, which they named Mozella after Elias’s wife. Hicks and his wife, Frances Culpepper Youngs, established their plantation close to Boutte, which follows the Old Spanish Trail, where ..." Read More


Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, b.1826, d. 1879, was the owner of Fashion Plantation. He was the son of President
Zachary Taylor and the brother-in-law of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Taylor was a U.S. Senator, 1856–1860;a colonel in the Louisiana Ninth Infantry (appointed by Governor Moore); was
appointed brigadier general in 1861;fought with distinction under Generals “Stonewall” Jackson and Robert E. Lee; was a member of Louisiana Secession Committee and chairman of the
Committee on Military and Naval Affairs;and enacted the Conscription Act to enlist
aid to fight Union troops. He is interred with his wife at Metairie Cemetery.

Ordinance of Secession

"St. Charles was one of twenty-nine parishes that supported secession on January 26, 1861. General Richard Taylor of Fashion Plantation was elected to represent the German Coast. His signature is included among those signing the document with the notation “of St. Charles” directly below. The German Coast was then no longer a part of the United States. For two months the German Coast was part of a new nation named the Republic..." Read More


Gravesite of Jean Baptist LaBranche and Eusebe LaBranche in St. Charles Borromeo Cemetery. (Jean—Ne’le 3 Mai 1777, de’ce’de’ le 27 Juillet 1837) (Eusebe LaBranche—Ne’le 8 Avril 1815, de’ce’de’ le 18 Nov. 1845)

LaBranche (Esperanza)

"LaBranche Plantation was established in 1765 on the site of present-day Esperanza by descendents of Johan Zweig who is listed in the 1724 census. Esperanza Plantation is presently owned by Judge Edward A. Dufresne and is the oldest, continuously operating plantation site in the parish. Jean Baptist LaBranche was a wealthy sugar planter in the first quarter of the nineteenth century residing in New Orleans and..." Read More


Didier Sidney Zeringue (nephew of Charles Troxler, who was the great, great-grandson of Johann Georg Troxler) and his wife, Amelie Troxclair. 
(Photo courtesy of descendent Anne Petit Hymel)

Descendants of Early Settlers

"Almost one hundred years had passed since those first German settlers survived horrific conditions at homeland ports waiting to sail and at sea, many dying enroute by starvation, illness, or later succumbing to the difficult climate after arrival in Louisiana. The new engagés (indentured agricultural workers) were considered habitants (concessionaires) of the company. They arrived debilitated and penniless, received small land grants, and were forced to sell their products to the..." Read More


 

F rom The LaBranche Dependency House. all accounts LaBranche Plantation in St. Rose was one of the grandest on the German Coast. Along with Fashion Plantation, it was destroyed during the Civil War. All that remained was the Dependency House, also called a garconniere (French for bachelor quarters). Olidé and Marie Perilloux Cambre purchased Lionel Joseph Cambre the Dependency House and property in 1902. Pictured here in 1910 from right to left are Olidé Thomassin Cambre (father) (1872–1923), Marie Perilloux Cambre (mother), Lionel (son), Thomas Olidé (son), Marie Cambre Williams (daughter), Bernadette Millet (niece), Elvetia Cambre Gilbert (daughter), and Gretta Cambre Jacob (daughter). The Lentini family of Kenner purchased and restored the property in 1983. The Dependency House is significant because of its exceptional Federal woodwork and rarity as a dependency. It is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. (Photos courtesy of Ronald Cambre)

 

 

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Didier Sidney Zeringue

Descendants of Early Settlers
Almost one hundred years had passed since those first German settlers survived horrific…

 

Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, b.1826, d. 1879

Ordinance of Secession
St. Charles was one of twenty-nine parishes that supported secession on January 26, 1861…

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Copyright © This text is copyright material by Marilyn Richoux, Joan Becnel and Suzanne Friloux, from St. Charles Parish, Louisiana: A Pictorial History, 2010.

 


Cite this Entry

MLA Style

Becnel, Joan Weaver, Suzanne Friloux, and Marilyn Mayhall Richoux. "Exploration and Discovery
(1542-1647)." Museum. History of St. Charles . St. Charles Museum and Historical Association,
29 2012. Web. 30 Nov 2012. <http://museum.historyofstcharlesparish.org>.

APA Style

Becnel, Joan Weaver, Suzanne Friloux, and Marilyn Mayhall Richoux. "Exploration and Discovery
(1542-1647)." Museum. History of St. Charles . St. Charles Museum and Historical Association,
29 2012. Web. 30 Nov 2012. <http://museum.historyofstcharlesparish.org>.

Chicago Style

Becnel, Joan Weaver, Suzanne Friloux, and Marilyn Mayhall Richoux. "Exploration and Discovery
(1542-1647)." Museum. History of St. Charles . St. Charles Museum and Historical Association,
29 2012. Web. 30 Nov 2012. <http://museum.historyofstcharlesparish.org>.

*  These articles and more are taken from a book published by the authors entitled St. Charles Parish, Louisiana: A Pictorial History.


 

 

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