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Les Allemans—Site of first German settlement in St. Charles

Located in Killona on La. 18 (River Road) at the St. Charles/St. John boundary line

L’Anse Aux Outardes (Bustard’s Cove)—First east bank settlement site

Located in New Sarpy on La. 48 (River Road)

St. Charles Borromeo—“Little Red Church”— Famous Mississippi River landmark

Located in Destrehan on La. 48 (River Road)

Destrehan Manor House— Originally constructed for Robert de Logny

Located in Destrehan on La. 48 (River Road)

Home Place Plantation—Built in 1790s

Located in Hahnville on La. 18 (River Road

LaBranche Plantation Dependency House— Only remaining building from the original plantation

Located in St. Rose on La. 48 (River Road)

Skirmish of Boutte Station—Civil War site

Located in Boutte on US/LA 90

Fashion Plantation—Home of General Richard Taylor

Located in Hahnville on La. 18 (River Road)

Battle of Des Allemands—Site of Civil War battles

Located in Des Allemands on US/LA 90

Flagville—Letter left at this site by Tonti for LaSalle

Located in Hahnville on La. 18 (River Road)

 

*Notes following historical marker information reflect supplemental or corrected information pertinent to the site. Historical markers were manufactured by Sewah Studios in Marietta, Ohio.

Les Allemands

Les Allemands Historical Marker

     German immigrants led by Karl Darensbourg in 1722 joined other settlers on Law’s concession in the Villages of Hoffen, Augsburg, and Mariental. The chapel was erected by 1724. These industrious German farmers saved New Orleans from famine. (Erected by German-Acadian Coast Historical & Genealogical Society) top


L’Anse Aux Outardes (Bustard’s Cove) 1722

Bustard’s Cove Historical Marker

     Settled by Canadians and the French. Bienville came here in 1699 from Lake Pontchartrain using small waterways, portage. LeSuer and Canadians used the route and were met here by Iberville and Tonti on February 24, 1700. It became part of the “Second German Coast” about 1730. (Note: Some west bank settlers moved to this east bank site in 1722.) (Marker missing in 2010) top


St. Charles Borromeo—“Little Red Church”

St. Charles Borromeo—“Little Red Church” Historical Marker

     First constructed of logs about 1740. Burned and rebuilt in 1806. Famous riverboat landmark, twenty-five miles from New Orleans where boat captains traditionally paid off their crew. Again burned and rebuilt about 1921. (Note: New white stucco Spanish mission-style church was built in 1921 and the 1806 wooden church was torn down later. Oldest German cemetery in the South. Church, cemetery, and school complex built on the original 1770 Spanish land grant.) (Erected by Louisiana Department of Commerce and Industry in 1964.) top


Destrehan Manor House

Destrehan Manor House Historical Marke

     Constructed in 1789–90 for Robert de Logny. Inherited by Jean Noel d’Estrehan in 1800. Bought from heirs of Pierre A. Rost in 1914 by Mexican Petroleum Company. Donated in 1972 to River Road Historical Society by American Oil Company. (Note: Purchased by Jean-Nöel Destrehan from deLogny estate. Site of Rost Home Colony following Civil War. Named by River Road Historical Society for Louisiana Statesman Jean-Nöel Destrehan.) (Erected by St. Charles Parish Police Jury and St. Charles Bicentennial Committee in cooperation with Louisiana Tourist Division of the Department of Commerce.) top


Home Place

Home Place Historical Marker

     Built in the 1790s, this French Colonial raised cottage is of West Indies bousillage construction. Owners included LaBranche, Fortier, and Gaillaire, with the Keller family ownership since 1885. (Note: A National Historic Landmark and is listed on National Register of Historic Places.) (Erected by St. Charles Parish Police Jury and St. Charles Bicentennial Committee in 1975 in cooperation with Louisiana Tourist Division of Department of Commerce.) top


LaBranche Plantation Dependency

LaBranche Plantation Dependency Historical Marker

     This late eighteenth–early nineteenth century Creole house is of statewide significance because of its exceptional Federal woodwork and its rarity as a plantation dependency. Listed on National Register of Historical Places. top


Skirmish of Boutte Station

Skimirish of Boutte Station Historical Marker

     Union train with sixty men ambushed by Confederate force of Louisiana militia and volunteers on September 4, 1862. Train escaped to New Orleans. Fourteen Union soldiers killed and twenty-two wounded in the skirmish. (Erected by St. Charles Parish Police Jury and St. Charles Bicentennial Committee.) top


Fashion Plantation

Fashion Plantation Historical Marker

     Home of General Richard Taylor, son of Zachary Taylor, Louisiana statesman and member of 1861 Secession Convention. Commanded Louisiana District, 1862–64; defeated Banks at Battle of Mansfield, 1864. Federals plundered home in 1862. (Erected by Louisiana Department of Commerce and Industry in 1961.) (Marker missing in 2010) top


Battle of des Allemands

Battle of des Allemands Historical Marker

Battle of des Allemands Historical Marker

     Le district des Allemands, settled by Germans about 1720, the scene of numerous skirmishes between Confederate guerillas and Union forces, 1862–63. Most famous skirmish resulted in capture of an entire detachment of Union soldiers on September 4, 1862. top


Flagville

Flagville Historical Marker

     Named for O. J. Flagg in 1870; now a part of Hahnville. Letter left here by Tonti in 1686 with Quinipissa chief for LaSalle. Taensa Village, 1713. De Veuve, French Concession, 1718. Site included grant to Joseph Roi de Villere, 1765. (Erected by Louisiana Department of Commerce and Industry in 1962.) top