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Parish officials, circa 1890, are standing in front of old courthouse. Back row, left to right: Anthony Madere, a later sheriff; Mr. Bestoso, court crier; Mr. Terregrossa, a deputy sheriff, and Frank Friloux. Mr. Charles Elfer, assessor, stands in the middle. Lower row, left to right stand: Judge Gauthier; Hicks Lewis Youngs, police juror; Sheriff Lewis Ory, who was later murdered; William Lussan, who later served as president of the police jury and its treasurer for twenty-eight
years; and J. C. Triche, Sr., clerk of court, whose family owned the the St. Charles Herald for over sixty years.

Public Education

"The LeMoyne brothers, Iberville and Bienville, were timeless advocates of schools to educate the colonial children. "He [Bienville] proposed the establishment of a school in New Orleans where the boys could be taught geometry, geography, and other subjects. He wrote, 'young men brought up in luxury and idleness are of little use.'" (E. Davis, Louisiana: The Pelican State) During the colonial..." Read More


Raymond K. Smith, teacher, principal, supervisor of colored schools, and assistant superintendent of schools, was keenly aware of the value of education and did all he could to see that the
students under his care had what was necessary for them to succeed. For his contribution
to education, the Raymond K. Smith Middle School in Luling opened in 2006 and was dedicated in
his honor.

Education Expansion

"Raymond K. Smith, teacher, principal, supervisor of colored schools, and assistant superintendent of schools, was keenly aware of the value of education and did all he could to see that the students under his care had what was necessary for them to succeed. For his contribution to education, the Raymond K. Smith Middle School in Luling opened in 2006..." Read More


Mexican Petroleum Company School students pictured in 1917.

Public Education

"With the arrival of the petroleum industry in the early 1900s, a major shift took place in the public school district. These major industries would not only begin to provide tax revenues which would help to bolster public education, but would also promote better schooling for their employees’ children. Because of their keen awareness of the importance of education, schools were established on some of the industry sites. Mexican Petroleum in Destrehan ..." Read More


A speaker addresses students during ceremonies for the first and last Hahnville Colored High School graduating class in 1952.

Education Update

"In the early sixties, the parish school system began to plan for desegregation of public schools. The voluntary integration of schools began in 1965–66, but it was not until 1969 that total integration of all schools occurred. Diligent and deliberate preparation by the administrators, faculties, and staffs and the cooperation of the parents and their children facilitated the implementation of integration..." Read More