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Pirogue. (Sketch by Janis Blair)

Breadbasket of the Colony

" On the German Coast during the 1720s, houses were built on both sides of the Mississippi River. The first German settlers continuously supplied the markets of New Orleans. They used the river to transport their surplus produce in small boats or canoes, known as pirogues, returning home through Lake Pontchartrain into Bayous Trepagnier and LeSieur, and other tributaries to the Mississippi River. Ellen Merrill, noted historian..." Read More


Didier Sidney Zeringue (nephew of Charles Troxler, who was the great, great-grandson of Johann Georg Troxler) and his wife, Amelie Troxclair. 
(Photo courtesy of descendent Anne Petit Hymel)

Descendants of Early Settlers

"Almost one hundred years had passed since those first German settlers survived horrific conditions at homeland ports waiting to sail and at sea, many dying enroute by starvation, illness, or later succumbing to the difficult climate after arrival in Louisiana. The new engagés (indentured agricultural workers) were considered habitants (concessionaires) of the company. They arrived debilitated and penniless, received small land grants, and were forced to sell their products to the..." Read More


P. A. Torres is a typical river shrimp fisherman.

The Great Outdoors

"For centuries in St. Charles Parish, the rivers, bayous, swamps, and lakes provided the citizens with unlimited fish and game for recreation as well as commerce for those individuals who preferred working in the great..." Read More


First Families - The Pioneers

First Families - The Pioneers

"In addition to those first families of St. Charles Parish, those pioneers listed in the 1724 census, other German families not listed in the 1724 census were in the area and eventually came to the German Coast including: Jacob Huber (Oubre), Thomas Lesch (Laiche), Mueller, Johann Weber, Pierre Brou, Michael Zehringer (Zeringue), Schaf (Chauffe), Hans Reinhard Scheckschneider, Jean Zweig, ..." Read More


While St. Charles Parish was growing and developing, individuals frequently described the area from an “outside” point of view. J. W. Door, a gentleman connected with the editorial department of the New Orleans Crescent, was one of those detailing parish activities and geography in the mid-nineteenth century. He made a horse-and-buggy tour of a considerable portion of the state of Louisiana during the spring and summer of 1860, publishing letters in the Crescent between April 30 and September 10, 1860. Each letter was signed “Tourist.” – The Louisiana Historical Quarterly, Volume 21, No. 4, October 1938

Tourist’s View of Parish

"While St. Charles Parish was growing and developing, individuals frequently described the area from an “outside” point of view. J. W. Door, a gentleman connected with the editorial department of the New Orleans Crescent, was one of those detailing parish activities and geography in the mid-nineteenth century. He made a horse-and-buggy tour of a considerable portion of the state of Louisiana during the spring and summer of 1860, publishing letters in the Crescent between April 30 and ..." Read More


Early 1800’s Letter from the Coast

Early 1800’s Letter from the Coast

"This correspondence is translated from old German script and reveals life of a German Coast resident. Although rumors were rampant, it appears from this letter that settlers did not realize they were again a French colony..." Read More