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Extraction of St. Charles Parish - Persac Map (Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection, Detail from Norman's Chart of the Lower Mississippi River by Marie Adrien Persac–Accession #1974.1)

The Antebellum Period

"In the eighteenth century, many early colonists were afforded land grants and established plantations and businesses. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, many Americans navigated down the Mississippi River in all manner of craft to settle in the Louisiana Territory. By 1804, more than eighty years had passed since the German Coast had been established and the floodgates opened to newcomers..." Read More


An aerial view of the Pan American/Amoco
Refinery in Destrehan.

Plantations to Petroleum - East Bank

"As the centuries changed, so did the landscape of St. Charles Parish. In colonial times, the German Coast was the breadbasket of the colony. The breadbasket continued through the prosperous Spanish era as it did during the plantation era, when the wealthy planters and their landholdings dominated the economy and politics. From the McCutcheons, Destrehans, Rosts, LaBranches, and Trépagniers to the Sellers and St. Amands, the power of land translated ..." Read More


Paintings of the 1811 Slave Revolt by artist Lorraine Gendron

1811 Slave Revolt

"The slave Charles Deslondes is thought to have been brought from St. Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the Deslondes Plantation in present-day LaPlace. Some slaves assumed their owners surnames. Charles was temporarily employed by nearby plantation owner Manuel Andry as a wagon driver, which enabled him to move about. He began recruiting slaves from Andry’s and other plantations along the German Coast to plan a revolt..." Read More


An indigo processor. (Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection. Acc. No. 1979.128)

The Culture of Sugar Cane

"Indigo, the main crop of German Coast settlers for many years, had been brought to the colony from the West Indies in the 1700s. This tropical plant produced a lasting blue dye important to the European textile industry and the blue color remains very popular even today in cotton denim fabric of blue jeans. However, today almost..." Read More