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Related Entries relating to "Revolutionary War"

Louisiana Purchase Map. (Used with permission from the Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism, State of Louisiana Bicentennial brochure.)

The Louisiana Purchase – 1803

"Fearing Napoleonic France’s control of the mouth of the Mississippi River, and with a desire to preserve and expand the agricultural character of the United States, President Thomas Jefferson sent James Monroe and Robert Livingston to France in early 1803 to negotiate for the purchase of New Orleans and as much land east of the Mississippi River as possible. On April 29, 1803, Napoleon unexpectedly agreed to sell the entire Louisiana Territory for only $15 million..." Read More


Lussan Store, Luling, was built in the late 1800s and moved three times for levee setbacks.

Early Roadways and Commerce

"In 1860, the German Coast residents still had dirt roadways that remained well into the twentieth century. Road construction was left to the respective parishes. The most used roads on both banks were those running along the Mississippi River. Those riding on horseback or in horse-drawn buggies were faced with many obstacles, depending on the weather. Planks were sometimes laid to reinforce the dirt roads. Crude ferries carried travelers across the larger bayous, but the Mississippi River continued..." Read More


Wheels, Wheels, Wheels

Wheels, Wheels, Wheels

"In 1908, Henry Ford began producing his Model T. In 1915 in Mobile, Alabama, a group of automobile enthusiasts, spirited by the Spanish padres and conquistadores, met and organized the “Old Spanish Trail Project.” The project promoted a paved automobile highway across the southern United States connecting St. Augustine, Florida, to San Diego, California. Louisiana became a thorn in the side of the trail organization, failing to pave the road and replace ferries with bridges. In 1919, shamed by..." Read More